Inquirer interviews Rob Paine

By Worship Recordings

Inquirer interviews Rob Paine

Paine slips some house into the reggae mix at Filo's
By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER THE SPIN "We take a humble approach, we don't force-feed," said Rob Paine, talking about how he coaxes his audience into accepting a little house music in his Friday night reggae mix. For about three years, Paine and Solomonic Sound partner Zach Eberz have been pleasing reggae listeners Fndays at Filo's. "It's been consistent; we're blessed every Friday with people not wanting to leave." Yet patrons of Filo's may not be aware of Paine's whole sound - co-mingling dub and house heard on Wor.CD.01, released in April. The compilation, which includes "Children of Israel" and "Night Life," features tracks from his first 10 releases on Worship Records, a label he started in 1998 with Dan McGehan. "It is the best of both worlds," Paine said, "because it is a compilation and DJ mix, too." The CD debut has done well, receiving positive reviews and working the college music charts for about two months, Paine said. But it has been a learning experience. "It's not like putting out a single is hot, then fades out. You have to really work it, market it," Paine said. A DJ for 10 years and a music connoisseur even longer, Paine can also be found at Saint Jack's on Tuesdays or monthly at Silk City spinning house (he may miss a couple of dates while he promotes the album). Though Paine would like to spin more of his sound in the city, he won't jump at just anything. He wants the time and circumstances to be right. "I want to be able to pop off every time I do it," he said. Patience will continue to carry him through. The label has yet to make a profit, he admitted, but he would never sell out. "We would never change our style," he said. A spiritual person, evident in both his conversation and his mixes, Paine has been involved in music throughout his life - he began playing the saxophone in fourth grade - but his sound has always been roots music because of its uplifting quality. "Even through punk days it's been the backbone," Paine said. Saturday he and Eberz will be in Jamaica, not doing reggae, but, interestingly enough, spinning house.