News: Press

The Spin - Philadelphia Inquirer article on BLISS

By Worship Recordings

The Spin - Philadelphia Inquirer article on BLISS

Never thought to venture to the Avenue of the Arts for anything more than classical music or theater? To that we say: Rob Paine... Bliss... and Tuesdays.

"It's real laid back," DJ-producer Paine says of the Avenue, countering misconceptions of an uptight atmosphere.

A lounge (there is no dance floor), Bliss maintains its leisurely flow by opening its doors onto Broad Street for an outdoor patio.

"The location is great," Paine says. "I've never played in such a central location before."

After a hiatus, Paine returned two weeks ago to his Tuesday gig, where he offers "a mishmash" of house and dub - and guests. This week, King Britt will assume his Scuba persona to help hold down the evening with Paine, who says he will be inviting friends on a monthly basis.

Ever the multitasker (Paine's name is synonymous with his roots-and-reggae weekly with Zacharijah at Filos on Fridays), the host also will be busy Saturday at Silk City's "Shakedown."

"Those parties have been outstanding; they're always packed," Paine says. "We leave feeling upbeat about house music."

Paine and Willyum, his cohort in the monthly residency at Silk City, have more to feel upbeat about this week as "Shakedown" does double duty as the record-release party for "Time," their tribal house track.

Paine would seem pressed for time himself with his residencies, label, and being a cross-country traveler, but he loves it all.

"I can't stop," he says.

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Philadelphia's Worship Recordings

By Worship Recordings

Philadelphia's Worship Recordings
by Dj Dennis Selekta.com Before I even made the big move to the City of Brotherly Love called Philadelphia, I already knew that there were some great people and a plethora of amazing music waiting there for me. What was fantastic is when I found out just how great it is when a small group of producers and DJs are the actual people creating that amazing music, and how welcoming they were when I moved into town. Not only did they give me a chance to come spin some tunes at their long running night in Old City, but they introduced me to so many other positive people who were involved in Philly۪s nightlife. Rob Paine and Willyum from Worship Recordings are excellent role models for production companies, DJs, and producers to set a standard by. They are true to their city, their music, their city۪s culture, their friends, and all else that surrounds them. I was honored to finally get some questions together to share who they really are, and to have them express their thoughts and feelings toward the city they live in and the nightlife that they support and give so much to. -Dj Dennis INTERVIEW WITH ROB PAINE and WILLYUM OF WORSHIP RECORDINGS Taken from Worship Recordings website_ "It was sometime around the fall of 1998 when Rob Paine and Dan McGehean were sitting around and having_um_tea one afternoon in Philly when the concept of Worship Recordings came into sight. With both the right ingredients that the two had to offer - a label was born. And with the insight of long time bredren Zach Eberz (other half of Solomonic Sound) Worship Recordings was molded into a label that concentrates on the dub factor of house music. Whether it is deep and bubbling, or jackin' and rollin', there is always a mix that any house head can't test on a Worship plate. Worship will be taking dub music to its furthest ends, weaving house and reggae side by side in this here I-wah. Through the sight of Ras Tafari, we will put a conscious message into the already conscious vibe that takes place in our culture of dance. " DJ Dennis - Every DJ has a pivotal event that turned them on to the music they spin...what was it for you? Rob - I don۪t believe there is a distinctive pivotal event or point in my lifetime that brought me to where I am now with my music. With DJing or producing I am constantly taking in new music of all genres and always hearing new elements in songs I already know and love. It۪s a levity event that takes place everyday. Will - About 1990/91 there was a party here in Philly called "Garden of Eden" put on by Nigel Richards and the Horizon Group. That was the first rave I attended that had a deep house room. The slower pace, the funky baselines, the soulful vocals; that was what I was looking for in my "techno." I just didn't realize it until that night. DJ Dennis - From that time, what has stayed consistent to you for all those years? i.e. style, attitude, message in the music, etc.? Rob - Definitely attitude. The D.I.Y. way of life is what we follow. Love is always the message. Never enough and not enough in this world. Love doesn't have to be some hippie thing or new age thing, its reality, and for some reason its hard for people today around the globe to express to EVERYONE. Even your enemies... especially your enemies. Kill them with love and you can never go wrong. Have a clean and pure heart and mind. Will - I would definitely say my attitude/outlook has stayed pretty consistent for me over the decade I have been interested and involved in the house scene. I think I have hung onto a little of that PLUR vibe from the early nineties for sure. DJ Dennis - What does Philly have for you that has kept you here? What does this town mean to you? Rob (Many things) Culture, amazing musicians, producers, singers, song writers, DJ's and everything in between. Philly is home base and always will be. The greater part of my life has been here. Even as a youth I would get so excited coming downtown Philly, checking out the graf on the way in, all the sounds coming from the streets, people of nationalities from all over the world. Every city is like that I guess but Philly has my heart and soul sealed bonded to it. There are also the people who represent Philly and fight for it: Gamble & Huff and every person that came out of Sigma Sound, John Coltrane, "Philly" Joe Jones, Sun Ra and the Arkestra, The Roots, Gill Scott, King Britt, Josh Wink, Dozia, Lady Alma, Rich Medina, Peter Blacks International Sound System, Hopeton Brown, etc. There are way too many to even list. I feel honored to say I am from the same city as these amazingly talented peeps. Will - This is my home. It just feels right. It's in my blood, in my genes. I identify with this city and I don't think I would never be able to feel as much at peace and in my element in any other city. I grew up 20 minutes North West of the city, and when I was a kid I can remember making trips downtown with my family to see a baseball game or whatever. I would always be so fascinated with our skyline, how from the greenery of the suburbs erupts a pretty massive cityscape. The impact of these moments on me as a kid, the awe I felt, made me realize that what I wanted was to be involved and contribute to the culture of the amazing historical city in my backyard. DJ Dennis - What is your take on the current night life here in Philly? Rob Its thriving, with so many things going on. I don t just check house music events so I am never burned out. As far as throwing events, it is hit or miss. I feel blessed everytime we get the heads in the door. We are soldiers in a way that we will never give up on Philly and always do our part in throwing events and bringing talent that is an inspiration to us to town. Will Interesting times here in Philly. The underground culture which was so vibrant and expansive in the 90's is pretty much, well, underground. There is a bit of a backlash at DJ and electronic music culture right now as well so rock, 80's, R&B, and Hip-Hop are taking over the nightlife. I believe in cycles though, and like fashion, music genres come and go in commercial popularity. I hope that electronic music, specifically house, comes back around- but if people have a good time and get their shit on to 50 Cent, Beyonce, 80's, whatever- that's cool too. We all really just want to have fun when we go out. DJ Dennis - What is the idealism behind Worship Recordings, Solomonic Sound, and your individual parts that each of you play? Rob - I kind of touched on that above in the other questions on the topic of Love, Unity & Strength. Some of us hail up Emperor Haile Selassie I as our king, while some of us worship a head a lettuce called Ralf :-) but we all have the same love for each other and respect each others۪ opinions and individual ideals. Every human has their own religion and people of the world need to learn to respect this. People tend to be too extreme, and from that comes hate and war. It۪s a pretty simple philosophy_ 'Do unto others as you want done unto you.' In every book of religion out there, that is one thing that is always stated at some point in the reading, although maybe not using the exact same words. But do you really need a book to tell you that? It comes from your heart, and you already have it in your conscious. The parts that we play are making sure we ALL do our part! Will - I joined the guys as label manager to handle business affairs in 2000, and I can't say that I have really heard anyone talk about a con crete "ideal" behind the label as such. We were, however, founded in 1998 by Rob and Dan to release and promote/develop the "dub house" sound . This was due to Rob, Dan & Zack's passion for both roots reggae and deep house sounds and the very interesting and musical fusion Rob & Zack were creating in the studio. We also have always had a strong drive to put out a quality total package, from the music down to the center label and jacket artwork. I think it is important for everyone to realize that we don't just play or deal in the "dub house" sound however- Pete Moss's ZEN METHOD EP and the (E)MOTION DETECTORS track "Cuba Rico" show the other side of house we really appreciate as well. We hope to explore and release other styles of deep house like that in the future. DJ Dennis - With all the ups and downs in the music industry over the past couple of years, what has kept your drive to stay up in it? Rob It۪s actually a new disease that hasn't been named yet. I feel bad for anyone that has caught it too!:-) In it for life, no going back now_always a forward movement! Will - It's really all that I know! I mean, I have a college degree, could probably find a cubicle job pretty easily- but I made a strong conscious choice to work in this scene as more than just a local DJ and to try to make house music a viable career. If the day comes that we really have to fold our hand, well so be it. Until then I۪ll keep plugging away and finding ways to make it happen... DJ Dennis - Are there any particular productions of yours (individually and as a group effort) that you feel consistently represent you as a whole? Or is there something similar you keep in each production? Rob - I would like to think that everything we do represents us as a whole. We love house music, reggae, soul, jazz, funk, punk, breaks, and the classics. All those elements can be heard throughout our releases at one point or another. I can t put my finger on one production, can you? I feel good about everything we have ever put out. Will On the discography level I think there is definitely a common thread that binds them all together, although to put that thread into words isn't easily done..."general vibe" I suppose, although that doesn't really do it justice. DJ Dennis - When working with other producers, are there any that you specifically mesh with the best? Is there anyone that you really have a urge to work with on a project? Rob - Yes, the ones that I have records out on labels with! I would like to work with King Tubby but unfortunately he left this planet already. Will I'm too new at the production thing, I۪ve only really worked with Rob and a few other local producers here and there. I've gotta explore and learn some more on my own first... DJ Dennis - What does HOUSE MUSIC mean to you? Rob - Sweaty parties with the gals shakin' it, good vibes, meditation, the sun rising, still dancing, sound systems, good sound systems, very good sound systems! Will - Pretty much everything, from spiritual release to paying the bills. DJ Dennis - What is your definition of a DJ and what they should do? Rob - Don't flop the dance. proper selections for your surroundings and crowd. skills, experimenting without losing people, and making sure the sound system sounds good. Too many DJ۪s just go up there and jack all the knobs up and think they are the shit but really the shit is coming out of the speakers in something called distortion and overdriving. Will I don't know if I have one definition of a DJ really, I think it depends on the situation and the skill the individual has at adapting to the situation and creating a positive sonic atmosphere for whatever the people want to do. Sometimes that is created by flawless beat matching, sometimes by scratching and dropping hip-hop... DJ Dennis - When people hear the name Worship, what do you want them to think? Rob - A household name by the year 2009. Will - A quality package start to finish; from artwork to the music production to the vinyl itself. We may not be the biggest label in deep house but we always strive for a top notch package and to consistently release quality tracks that fit the Worship discography. DJ Dennis - What is your take on vinyl vs. Cdr. vs. mp3? Rob - Mp3۪s are no good to play live. They should only be used for listening and saving hard drive space. For me, vinyl sounds the best hands down. It has the edge and fullness I want to hear and feel when DJing. CD۪s are great too, especially for pre-release tracks in the works and classics you don t want to travel with anymore. I am all about finding that yin and yang between the two. You really have to be aware of your EQ'ing and levels while mixing CD into vinyl and vice versa. but you know its all gonna be about your laptop. I am not feeling the sound of Final Scratch but I know there are some programs that will be sounding proper coming in the near future. I will wait for that point and then jump on the bandwagon. Will - Honestly I have no beef with DJing with CDs. 5-10 years ago I felt different but now the decks are so good. But, I suppose I do really prefer the feel of cold vinyl in my hands DJ Dennis - What is in the works for you this year (events, releases, productions, tours, etc.)? Rob - 'Shakedown' every second Saturday of the month at Silk City. 'Heavy' every Tuesday night at Soma where we play down tempo, underground, reggae, jazzy and soulful breaks, deep house, and classics; a whole mash up. We keep busy as a reggae sound system as well with Solomonic, making sure we are always playing the most current culture and dancehall riddems as well as all the classics, known and forgotten. Our dub-plate reserve is starting to get pretty nice too! You have to be playing dubs if you want to be a ranking sound system. We do a weekly every Friday at Filo's and every first Thursday of the month at Silk City. Check out both Solomonicsound.com and worshiprecs.com for the fullness on all events. We are trying to have one release every month out on Worship. definitely been in studio mode lately. Hipp-e and I have a release coming out on Large Records under the alias 'Well Red' sometime by the end of the year. Hipp-e, Zack and I worked on a release for Worship under the 'Trinity All-Stars' name that came out a few months ago. I am finishing up something right now for Jah Love Recordings to be released early next year. I also have a remix for the label Citrona on the board to finish. Will and I (no alias as of yet) are finishing up an EP right now that will most likely be a worship release but could go to another label. I۪ve also been working on reggae riddems and consistently recording artists here up at Worship studios and down in Jamaica. All that soon to come, LOOK OUT! I did most of my traveling out of town for the year besides surrounding cities. I۪m really trying to lock myself in the studio. NYE I am playing In Jamaica. but most importantly, I am marrying my queen, Kelly, in January on the beach in Treasure Beach, Jamaica. and at the end of march we are expecting a youth into the world. (no WMC for me this year!) Everything is everything. Did I forget anything?........blessed love Will - We have an EP of Solomonic Sound Classics coming up (a reissue EP), as well as a 2 track sampler with a track by Chris Udoh and another by Gary Beck from Glasgow. Also, Rob Paine and myself are finishing up a track which should be out on the label right after the new year. I'm definitely excited about that. November 13th at our monthly label party, THE SHAKEDOWN we hosted RaSoul, w hich was a fantastic night. We are currently putting together a good lineup of DJs for this event but I don't want to name any names so I don't jinx anything! *** For everything Worship, make sure to check out WWW.WORSHIPRECS.COM ***

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BrokeN Beat Radio

By Worship Recordings

BrokeN Beat Radio
Switching things up with Worship label owner and reggae archivist, Rob Paine. Rob popped through with a mountain of scratchy 45's and dub plates for a smoke filled 2hour session, and threw down an amazing educational timeline of ska, reggae, dancehall, dub and downtempo. Producing a tracklisting was a daunting task... more info later. Can't get enough of the intro track taken from a Worship studios recording of President Brown. When in Philly do not miss his 4year running Solmonic Soundsystem at Filo's with partner Zacharijah. Always a blessed gathering, with positive vibes and Ras Tafari love in the place! (see Rob's event schedule to the right). Nuff quality music soon to come with friends from London, Detroit & Brasil... Screen Shot 2014-12-18 at 5.11.52 PM

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Time Out NY - August 2002

By Worship Recordings

Time Out NY - August 2002
High praise
Rob Paine's Worship Recordings pushes the intoxicating sounds of dub-house to a bottom-heavy peak By Bruce Tanturn House music has long relied on the Jamaica?born art of dub technique for a large part of the genre's appeal; there۪s no better way to enhance the out of body sensation of a truly intense house session than a dose of spliff friendly, echoey effects. Few house imprints employ the stripped down, effects laden ways of dub better than the Philadelphia based Worship Recordings, which recently released WOR.C0.01, a collection of the label's echo heavy music. The tracks were mixed by label leader Rob Paine who, on Saturday 3, will join the rest of the Worship crew in taking over Brooklyn's underground music headquarters, Halcyon, for a night of blunted beats. West Coast imprints such as Grayhound and Tango are the labels most often associated with dubby house, but Worship stretches the style to its limits. "I was influenced by those West Coast labels, "I think the music I make, and everything we release, kind of takes the sound a lot further," says the 30 year old Paine. Indeed, the label's music, produced by Rocket, Succulent, Solomonic Sound (Paine himself and partner Zack Eberz) and others, are positively dripping with swooshing reverb, heavy delay, deeper than deep bass and snippets of Rasta tinged vocals. The reggae connection carries over to the label's imagery, with Rasta iconography like the Lion of Judah and the Seal of King Solomon adorning each record. (Paine and Eberz also run straight reggae parties in Philly and elsewhere.) Paine's love for the music dates back to his childhood days. "Reggae is the sound I love?it's just running through my blood. When I was in the fourth or fifth grade," he says, ,'my older brother's friends would make me these rnix tapes of groups like the English Beat, the Police and the Clash. I loved those mixes, but it wasn't until much later that I realized that they all were heavily reggae influenced." By the time Paine was in I 1th grade, he was fully into real deal reggae, and he still makes regular record shopping excursions to Kingston. Paine, who's proficient on sax, spent the early '90s working the South Jersey and Philly club circuit with a ska?funk band called Hyperactive. He then enrolled at Temple University as a jazz improv major, but his education was cut short by a car accident in'94. "It knocked my two front teeth out, the top ones," he says. "It fucked up my embouchure, which is how you hold a wind instrument in your mouth. I couldn't play anymore." Luckily, he had been deejaying a bit on the side. "I figured I'd better start spinning full on, because it was all I had at the time, musically speaking. That led me to where I am today, so I look at the accident as Jah's work, even though it was a horrible thing." Paine had picked up studio skills while working with Hyperactive and began laying down his dub heavy house tracks. He sent out a few demos, but the music's deep excursions into reggae seemed to scare some labels? "I realized that we were going to have to put out the music ourselves," Paine says. "One of my best friends, Dan McGehean, had the financial means to set up a label, and I had the material and the ideals, so we were like, 'Let's just do it!' " The Paine produced Christian Street Princess EP was released in '98; that record, and the 13 that have followed, have found favor with a diverse array of house jocks, ranging from tech house duo Inland Knights to spiritual house guru Joe Clausell. Worship has even been welcomed into the progressive house camp; Paine claims Sasha and Digweed as fans, and a Solomonic Sounds remix of Universal Agents leads off the latest Bedrock mix CD, compiled by prog kingpin Chris Fortier. Even Worship's recording studio landlord is a fan, which means a lot: He's none other than the veteran Philly producer songwriter Kenny Gamble (of Gamble & Huff, who defined the soulful Sound of Philadelphia). "The first time he came over here, he was like, 'All right, who's the guy making all that music?' I'm like, 'Oh, shit, I'm sorry, I can turn it down.' He goes, 'No, man, it sounds great!' It's beautiful knowing that even someone like that can get into what we're doing." With all they have going for them, one might think the Worship crew is raking in the dough, but Paine claims that's not the case. "Everything we make goes into equipment and paying bills," he says, "and it's not like we sell lots in the first place, maybe a couple of thousand per release. Even that Bedrock money had to go directly to paying rent. We're broke, but at least we're feeling the love." Worship Recordings takes over Halcyon on Saturday 3. WOR.CD.01 is out now.
 

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Inquirer interviews Rob Paine

By Worship Recordings

Inquirer interviews Rob Paine
Paine slips some house into the reggae mix at Filo's
By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER THE SPIN "We take a humble approach, we don't force-feed," said Rob Paine, talking about how he coaxes his audience into accepting a little house music in his Friday night reggae mix. For about three years, Paine and Solomonic Sound partner Zach Eberz have been pleasing reggae listeners Fndays at Filo's. "It's been consistent; we're blessed every Friday with people not wanting to leave." Yet patrons of Filo's may not be aware of Paine's whole sound - co-mingling dub and house heard on Wor.CD.01, released in April. The compilation, which includes "Children of Israel" and "Night Life," features tracks from his first 10 releases on Worship Records, a label he started in 1998 with Dan McGehan. "It is the best of both worlds," Paine said, "because it is a compilation and DJ mix, too." The CD debut has done well, receiving positive reviews and working the college music charts for about two months, Paine said. But it has been a learning experience. "It's not like putting out a single is hot, then fades out. You have to really work it, market it," Paine said. A DJ for 10 years and a music connoisseur even longer, Paine can also be found at Saint Jack's on Tuesdays or monthly at Silk City spinning house (he may miss a couple of dates while he promotes the album). Though Paine would like to spin more of his sound in the city, he won't jump at just anything. He wants the time and circumstances to be right. "I want to be able to pop off every time I do it," he said. Patience will continue to carry him through. The label has yet to make a profit, he admitted, but he would never sell out. "We would never change our style," he said. A spiritual person, evident in both his conversation and his mixes, Paine has been involved in music throughout his life - he began playing the saxophone in fourth grade - but his sound has always been roots music because of its uplifting quality. "Even through punk days it's been the backbone," Paine said. Saturday he and Eberz will be in Jamaica, not doing reggae, but, interestingly enough, spinning house.
 

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DJ Times features Rob Paine

By Worship Recordings

DJ Times features Rob Paine

On his latest mix comp, Paine breaks out the big basslines. by Lily Moayeri To some it may seem strange to play house music with a dub reggae aesthetic, but to Rob Paine, it makes perfect sense. Deeply influenced by the music of Philadelphia's Jamaican community, Paine has managed to immerse himself in both cultures while not shortchanging either. "Any music that is good music is in my heart," says Paine. "Reggae is the foundation, house culture blew us away in the late '80s. Once you get to a dance and you feel the energy of what's going on, it relates to what we feel from reggae music and the vibes that we get. It's a positive feeling that is so good. We don't feel we're doing anything that hasn't been done before, we're trying to step up." A Dj spinning both genres for 10 years now, Paine established his imprint Worship Recordings with partner Dan McGehean in 1998. Bringing the warm, clubby basslines of reggae into the solid beats of house music, Worship combines the best elements of the two and his latest mix comp, Wor.CD.01 - A Worship Records Compilation, offers the label's best moments, especially on tracks produced by Rocket, Hakan Lidbo and Paine himself. Recording as Solomonic Sound with partner Zach Eberz, as Kidz On Christian Street with Chris Brann, as Divine Conception (a solo pseudonym) or simply as Rob Paine, reggae is the everpresent factor in every creation. A saxophone/jazz improvisation major at Temple University, Paine's background in bands and his musical evolution from punk rock to reggae and then house all figure into his original productions. Whether making a more reggae based tune or a more house oriented one, Paine employs the same gear. His studio includes Mark of the Unicorn's Digital Performer sequencing software which he says will soon be upgraded to a 3.0 system with an 896 firewire interface. He cuts vocals onto a Roland VS880 or DAT then chops them through an Akai S5000 or S1000 sampler. Vocals, drums and horns are cut with a Neumann M 147 microphone that runs into an Avalon AD2022 pre?amp and a Crane Song STC8 compressor. An Ensoniq DP4 Plus multi?effects processor, a Proteus 2000 synth module, E?Mu Classic Keys, a Roland MDCI Dance Module and a Juno 106 analog synth round out the studio. "That's all going to change once we go to the new interface and we can go right into the hard disk and everything is right up on the screen," says Paine of the production process. "We always take the dub style when we mix our stuff down with an analog board and are running the mix live. We do all the effects on the fly - nothing's pre-programmed. We'll do a couple of different takes and listen to which rises and swells, will be the best. We really want to combine both because we feel we can get certain things out of analog and outboard gear that we cannot get from plug-ins." At press time, Paine was maintaining three Philadelphia residencies, including Friday's Solomonic Sound System party at Filo's with partner Eberz. Accessing two Technics 1200 turntables, a Vestax PMC-46 mixer for cutouts and grabs, a Korg Kaoss pad for changing the parameters, a sampler for effects and vocal drops and a microphone, Paine and Eberz split time in and out of the booth. One plays the records, while the other runs the effects; one looks through the records and the other goes to the crowd to feel the mood. While following the Jamaican guidelines of the MC as "Dj" and the record spinner as "selector," Paine and Eberz do throw some house rules into the mix. "We beat match," he says. "Jamaicans think we're crazy cause they usually play a tune and chat about it in the middle to keep it up. With reggae there's so many different versions, we'll run version after version. I feel house music is going to get to this point. There are only so many tracks that can be made. There are a few that people are going to go back and redo. That's what's been going on in reggae for 40, 50 years, versions are redone, or updone, every 10 years. "When a version comes out, they'll maybe get three or four singers and a couple of DJs as well, have them voice a tune over the same rhythm. You'll buy the set, maybe six tunes on the same rhythm, they come in 7-inches, with different singers and you'll blend them, real fast. Right at the end of the chorus, you drop the next one in. Unless it's the big tune of the rhythm, you play that one the longest. It usually gets a forward or rewind. It's the same rhythm so the song doesn't really change, but the singers change." For his straight-up house Dj sets, Paine tries to bring in some reggae elements, but he plays to the crowd first. Preferring a Urei mixer for the house mixes, he might bring in a sampler and always a hand drum for added effect, but he stays within the house limitations, trying not to ask for a rewind, even when he's desperate for one. "When we're at a house dance and they're playing a big tune, I'll start banging on the wall saying, 'Pull up,"' he laughs. "Maybe one day we will be able to have sound clashes like that. When we have a crowd that's there for us, we do it. But you can't just do it and scare the shit out of everyone. But if you get it to a point where it's just bliss, you know when it's at that point 'cause the people are louder than that music, then you have to pull the record up. That's doesn't happen yet, maybe later. When you get to that point, that feeling in house music, it's longer. When I'm playing house, I'm in deep meditation. When you have that feeling, you're not pulling up the record, the energy is gradual. It's a lot different. It's hard to say what's a better feeling. I've definitely felt that spiritual feeling on both levels."

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Stuff @ Night interviews Rob

By Worship Recordings

Stuff @ Night interviews Rob

Mixing Paine + pleasure

Dj/producer Rob Paine's Rasta grooves by Bree Rolfce

THE SUN COMES up in the morning and goes down at night, and that's all you need to worry about." That may, be DJ/producer/Rastafarian Rob Paine's mantra, but with a record label to run, DJ gigs to play, and club nights to oversee, his worries lately extend far beyond the earth's daily cycles.

When he's not in the studio sorting out broken air conditioners and computer crashes, Paine is busy running the successful house label Worship Recordings with partners Zach Eberz and Dan McGehan. In addition, he has a full DJing schedule, which includes gigs at venues like London's legendary Fabric, as well as a local stop, at the Phoenix Landing on Wednesday, August 7. Paine is currently touring in support of Worship's first CD compilation, which was mixed by Paine and includes tracks produced by him and the rest of the Worship Records crew. The CD includes the label's first 10 releases, and it showcases its unique house?meets reggae sound. The label's ability to meld old and new genres, while still maintaining a forward?thinking sound, has earned it a solid reputation in the house scene. "Reggae has always been the foundation for us," Paine explains. "Even if in the '80s we were going to punk shows, there were always reggae DJs who played in between sets. Everything we did was built on that foundation. When it came to production, we just took elements from reggae. We just kind of brought it to the house music we were making."

Paine's interest in music began at a young age. In his hometown of Philadelphia, he started playing the saxophone in the fourth grade; by the age of 15, he was playing keyboards and saxophone in bands that were actually recording. After high school, he went on to college, where he continued to study jazz and the saxophone.. But in the early '90s, the young musician started attending outlaw parties, where he developed his love for house music. From then on, he divided his time between DJing and playing the saxophone until a 1995 car accident changed his course forever. Forced to give up the saxophone and his education, he began to concentrate completely on producing and DJing. "Now, I can't think of any other way it could have gone," says Paine. "I wasn't able to finish , but at the same time, for what I do now, I got as much schooling as I should have. It definitely helps me a lot with my writing. It makes everything come together more easily."

Paine's production work includes his solo tracks as well as collaborative work with partner Zach Eberz; collectively, the duo is known as Solomonic Sound. The pair plan to release a full length album by the end of the year. Currently, Paine is hard at work building the Worship Records name; he also has five remixes in the works for other labels, including Tango, Fiji, and the UK label Shaboom Recordings. In addition, he plans to continue DJing as much as possible. After his stop in Boston, he heads up to Canada for a mini tour. In addition to the house music projects that Paine and the Worship crew are involved in, they also run a successful reggae sound system and a popular club night in Philadelphia. Paine even still plays in some live acts.

By melding the house and reggae worlds, his work is helping to slowly change the face of house music. Whether working alone or with the other artists on Worship, Paine focuses on creating house music that is more thoughtful than dance music has traditionally been by writing better lyrics and using solid vocalists found through his reggae connections. "When I was first introduced to house in the late '80s, I was working at Blockbuster video, and I had a friend who liked hip?hop who went to parties where they played house," he says. "When he would try to explain house music to me, he would just dance, no words, just dancing. We want to start to put more words and meaning into that feeling that house music gives. Right now, it's been the same words over and over again for years. We want to try and bring in original singers who sing about the more spiritual side. We want to put more goodness into the music. We feel that there needs to be more love."

Right now explaining how he's trying to fix the studio's air conditioners so that the computers don't crash from the excessive summer heat Paine may not seem spiritual. But it's clear from the hypnotic, soulful sounds he consistently creates that while his worries may extend well beyond the rising and setting sun, they never obscure his overall view of a good vibe.

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Onion Australia reviews WOR.CD.01

By Worship Recordings

Onion Australia reviews WOR.CD.01

Worship Recordings
Mixed By Rob Paine (Worship Recordings)

When seminal UK progressive house label Guerilla decided to call their label albums Dub House Disco in 1992, the title superbly summed up the styles the records contained. Picking up the baton five years later, Philadelphia producer Rob Paine also picked up on dub as a key factor for his own label Worship and this mix CD, his own label introduction, contains Worship۪s first ten offerings.

Featuring dubbed out club tunes from the likes of Rocket (aka San Fransciso۪s DJ Garth and Eric James) and Swedish tech-house man Hakan Libdo, and seamlessly mixed by Rob himself, the CD thumps along at a typically progressive pace, though importantly adds reggae style sounds and vocal snippets to create a far more interesting and listenable vibe.

Frequently reminiscent of Leftfield at their creative early 90s best (when the English duo shared offices with Guerilla) almost all the tracks here offer rhythm and stealthily acquired vocal hooks, and it۪s no surprise that the label۪s already found support from the likes of Joe Claussell, Ben Watt and Silicon Soul.

Distinctive, highly listenable and original without being too experimental, Worship Volume 1 is the sound of a team that knows how, why and where they۪re going. And it sounds like their journey has only just began.

Jonty Adderley

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